SOUTH AFRICAN RADIO LEAGUE

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Amateur Radio is the greatest of all scientific hobbies

Updated 11 June 2018

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The South African Radio League is the National Body for Amateur Radio in South Africa and a member of the International Amateur Radio Union. Both organisations were  founded in 1925 and have a proud history of supporting communication science and technology and its continuous development

For more information on Amateur Radio visit www.sarl.org.za or call 011 675 2393 or email  secretay@sarl.org.za

For immediate Release

South Africa handed the YOTA flag as the official 2018 host 

80 young people between 16 and 25 from 34 Countries will take part in Youngsters on the Air event (YOTA) to be hosted in South Africa from 8 – 15 August 2018 by the South African Radio League (SARL). 

At an official handover event at Hamradio 2018, Europe’s largest annual exhibition of radio technology held in Friedrichshafen, Germany, South Africa received the official flag from the 2017 host, the Radio Society of Great Britain. Nico van Rensburg, SARL president and Koos Fick, SARL youth coordinator received the flag on behalf of South Africa.

 

“This annual event creates, in addition to amateur radio, the opportunity to learn about different nationalities and cultures, foster international friendships and goodwill as well as learning new radio communication and technical skills”, says SARL president, Nico van Rensburg.

 

YOTA brings together young radio amateurs who have a passion for amateur radio and technology to learn new skills, discuss and share ideas about amateur radio and its future. The event is being held in conjunction with Region one (Africa, Europe and parts of the Middle East) of the International Amateur Radio Union.

 

“During this year’s camp we will not just focus on teaching individual skills but look at empowering the group to become mentors in their own countries and transfer the skills they have learned in South Africa”, van Rensburg said.

 

The week long programme includes building a radio transceiver kit, becoming involved in launching and tracking of a high altitude balloon with various radio equipment on-board, hone their communication skills using multi frequency amateur radio stations and other technology and communications based activities.

 

“This is the first time that YOTA is hosted in South Africa”, van Rensburg said. As a relatively small organisation we need the financial support from the public, government and industry to pull this event off successfully. We see this as a unique opportunity to promote South Africa and showcase our expertise and diversity.”

 

Amateur Radio has been recognised as an ideal motivator for young persons to consider careers in electronics and communication. It is significant that countries that have the largest electronic industries also have the largest number of radio amateurs.

 

 

Full details about the event can be found on www.zs9yota.co.za or call Nico at
083 269 9939 to discuss sponsorships.

 

For media enquiries call Hans van de Groenendaal at 082 7814631.

 

L-R Nico van Rensburg ZS6QL, Florian OE3FTA, Mike 2E0MLJ, Koos ZR6KF and Lisa PA2LS.

Pictures and logo can be downloaded from http://www.amateurradio.org.za/media.htm

 

15 April 2018

Community Support celebrated on World Amateur Radio Day

April 18, is World Amateur Radio Day (WARD), this year marking the 93rd anniversary of the International Amateur Radio Union (IARU), founded in Paris in 1925. Each year, WARD celebrates Amateur Radio's contribution to society. “It is a celebration of what the Amateur Radio Service has brought to the public over the years, and of their ability to provide communication to assist others in times of crisis."

Amateur Radio experimenters were the first to discover that the shortwave spectrum -- far from being the wasteland "experts" of the time considered it to be -- could support worldwide communication. In the rush to use these shorter wavelengths, Amateur Radio was "in grave danger of being pushed aside. Amateur Radio pioneers met in Paris in 1925 and created the IARU to support Amateur Radio around the globe.

Two years later, at the International Radiotelegraph Conference, Amateur Radio gained the allocations still recognised today -- 160, 80, 40, 20, and 10 meters. The IARU has been working to defend and expand Amateur Radio frequency allocations ever since.

 

From the 25 countries that formed the IARU in 1925, the IARU has grown to include 160 member-societies in three regions. IARU Region 1 includes Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and Northern Asia. Region 2 covers the Americas, and Region 3 is comprised of Australia, New Zealand, the Pacific island nations, and most of Asia. The International Telecommunication Union (ITU) has recognised the IARU as representing the interests of Amateur Radio. The South African Radio League (SARL) was amongst the first national organisations to join the IARU in 1925

Today amateur radio embraces many aspect of radio communication, electronics and computer science, encouraging experimentation in new and digital technologies. 

“This year an additional focus on World Amateur Radio Day in South Africa is celebrating youth in Amateur Radio, supporting activities to encourage young people between 16 and 25 years old to take up amateur radio as a precursor to following a career in communication and electronics, two sectors of our economy where our country is seriously lacking”, Nico van Rensburg, SARL president said.

 

One of the major event is YOTA 2018. From 8 – 15 August South Africa will host 80 young Radio Amateurs from 34 countries in Europe, Africa and parts of the Middle East, for a week-long international amateur radio camp called  YOTA (Youngsters–on–the–Air Summer Event).

 

“This annual event creates, in addition to amateur radio, the opportunity to learn about different nationalities and cultures, foster international friendships and goodwill as well as learning new radio communication and technical skills”, says SARL president, Nico van Rensburg.

 

YOTA brings together young radio amateurs under the age of 26 who have a passion for amateur radio and technology to learn new skills, discuss and share ideas about amateur radio and its future. The event is held in conjunction with Region one (Africa, Europe and parts of the Middle East) of the International Amateur Radio Union.

 

“During this year’s camp we will not just focus on teaching individual skills but look at empowering the group to become mentors in their own country and transfer the skills they have learned in South Africa”, van Rensburg said.

 

The week long programme includes building a radio transceiver kit, becoming involved in launching and tracking of a high altitude balloon with various radio equipment on-board, hone their communication skills using multi frequency amateur radio stations and other technology and communications based activities.

Nico van Rensburg ZS6QS, SARL President

click on pic to download

 

For more information visit www.zs9yota.co.za

MEDIA RELEASE

30 March 2018 

For immediate release 

International Amateur Radio youth camp for the first time in South Africa

80 participants from 34 Countries

South Africa will host 80 young Radio Amateurs from 34 countries in Europe, Africa and parts of the Middle East, for a week-long international event from 8 – 15 August 2018. This is the first time that YOTA (Youngsters–on–the–Air Summer Event) is presented in South Africa and hosted by the South African Radio League (SARL).

“This annual event creates, in addition to amateur radio, the opportunity to learn about different nationalities and cultures, foster international friendships and goodwill as well as learning new radio communication and technical skills”, says SARL president, Nico van Rensburg. 

YOTA brings together young radio amateurs under the age of 26 who have a passion for amateur radio and technology to learn new skills, discuss and share ideas about amateur radio and its future. The event is held in conjunction with Region one (Africa, Europe and parts of the Middle East) of the International Amateur Radio Union. 

“During this year’s camp we will not just focus on teaching individual skills but look at empowering the group to become mentors in their own country and transfer the skills they have learned in South Africa”, van Rensburg said. 

The week long programme includes building a radio transceiver kit, becoming involved in launching and tracking of a high altitude balloon with various radio equipment on-board, hone their communication skills using multi frequency amateur radio stations and other technology and communications based activities. 

“We invite companies and other technology institutions to join YOTA 2018 summer event as sponsors both financially and in kind. We are currently still short of R200 000, finance we have to find in the next two months.   

This kind of sponsorship is not solely a Social Investment contribution, but is indeed a marketing opportunity for companies and organisations. Sponsors will be making an invaluable contribution to amateur radio and youth career development.  This is an opportunity to showcase and promote South Africa on an international platform, and to create further interest in this country as a business or vacation destination. Sponsors will receive extensive exposure both formally and informally in around 35 countries as the event will feature in news bulletins, newspapers, magazines, websites and TV coverage.” van Rensburg said. 

Full details about the event can be found on www.zs9yota.co.za or call Nico at 083269 9939 to discuss sponsorships.

Issued on behalf of the South African Radio League by Hans van de Groenendaal. Tel 082 781 4631.

Y0TA 2017, held in the UK. The SA team is on the left.

 

YOTA 2018 Logo . Click on logo to download a hi-res version